How to apply makeup

Feat. Keira

This video is satirical interpretation of the beauty industry and its effect on young girls including myself. I wanted to capture the curiosity and innocence first present when girls begin playing with makeup. 

Cheyenne, a fellow student in graphic design, is mother to the sweetest gal Keira. Having Keira be my model was an absolute treat and a unique experience.I prepared for her arrival by renting the photo studio on the fifth floor, collecting as much kid-friendly makeup I have not used and I even purchased some because I really wanted her to be excited and have many tools to explore. I knew that in order to emphasize her personal discovery, the best way to do so would be to let her play as I would have when I was young playing with my mother’s makeup in my room. So for forty minutes I let the camera record as she played in her own wonderland. In all honesty just seeing her smile and laugh at her make over was one of the purest moments because it was not plagued by insecurity or beauty standards. That is when my idea clicked. I could highlight her journey interacting with makeup as a child while also making a commentary on beauty standards women face.

The audio track would be the final detail with enough power to push my idea further and it was not until my friend showed me the song “Keep Young and Beautiful” by Abe Lyman that I knew I had found the absolute perfect song. It encapsulated the history of makeup (as it has been a popular trend for centuries) and the lyrics emphasized the beauty standards women are pressured to succumb to daily. The peppiness of the song also kept the feeling fun as one would think when looking at the video first glance, but then it becomes one of the key figures in juxtaposing the good and bad of makeup in my video. I am quite proud of how the final film turned out because I think it covered all the aspects of my argument without confusion.